Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV

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As it is, it is very common. Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV (the main brand, now the European emission regulations have killed the big and aging Shoguns), is the best-selling hybrid add-on across Europe and was sold here in January 2018 for more than 100,000. In the UK, this is the best-selling plug-in – hybrid or full electric – for the past three years, better than the BMW 330e, the Mercedes C350e, the VW Passat GTE, the Nissan Leaf and others. This number. And then some.

You can say the Outlander PHEV is ‘facelifted’ for 2019 – but that’s not true because it looks exactly the same as the replaced car, except for a pair of new LED headlights and different wheels. This is also the same story inside. Same as old cars for all powers and all shortcomings. Mitsubishi says its customers are good enough and fair enough.

Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV
Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV

Just like the last few years here – since the last facelift in 2016. Unlike a regular Outlander, you can’t have seven seats because the batteries need to stay in one place and under the boot lid. Easily, ICE is the only penalty for going to PHEV instead, so the boot is still a reasonable 463 liters and the rear seat is quite spacious given the size of the car. The front has been redesigned and you can have better skin than before. The driving position is high and mostly comfortable – but there is no height adjustment or power operation for the front passenger.

There is no good sat-nav – even as an option. Mitsubishi said they might recommend it in the future, but not offering them was not a big problem. However, most people today use their mobile phones either in the cradle or connected with Apple CarPlay or Android Auto – both at Outlander. If Mitsubishi’s default navigation is the same as other systems, we advise you to forget it. The screen is small, low res and arrogant menu. You’ll be better with your phone.

As for the design and layout, it feels like age. While none of the plastics is satisfactory to the touch, it is undoubtedly not strong enough to hold even the most ridiculous five-year-old child. A small utilitarian – especially some switchgear – – but not clearly stated (except for the lack of nav).

Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV
Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV
As for how it feels to drive – this new engine is softer than it changes. You feel a rubber band and a glare as you do in CVT, but the 2.4 tonne, which is quieter and less attractive, makes it a little more durable. Driven like a normal person, you don’t hear much – EV mode has nasty blows, making Outlander’s ICE easy to play without playing too often.

Revised front and rear shock absorbers should make it smoother. Indeed – a little – but still not the softest SUV. There is a small turbulence, blistering and rolling, and although there are still a few recoil between the wheels, a stronger body shell means less echo (thanks to a new type of welding). The steering wheel is a little faster and Mitsubishi has worked hard to make the brakes feel natural – but the first is still slow and unnoticed (good and confident on the highway) and the last springy, with not enough bite on the pedal. It doesn’t have to be a sports car. We’re very used to driving SUVs like now – because they all share platforms – Outlander sometimes feels a bit like anarchism. Because it still feels like 4×4, not the car.

The toll road is at least quiet – the road noise is well printed and there is only a slight wind noise due to its size and height.

Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV
Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV
If you’re thinking of PHEV, you’re doing it for one of two reasons – you like the idea of being a bit more environmentally friendly or you’re a major businessman who wants to minimize your tax obligations. Both are valid and both are reasons to consider the Outlander.

Charging takes four hours from a normal household outlet, 230V / 16amp – 30 minutes longer than an old car. The battery size increases and the charging time increases. CHAdeMO charger will be 80 percent in 25 minutes. Mitsubishi said PHEV is compatible with ‘smart grids’, so that like the Nissan Leaf, it can send energy back to the grid. It seems that it can provide 10 hours of electricity to ordinary houses downhill with full and full fuel.

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